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Class Schedules

These lists will be constantly updated as we get closer to the event, so make sure to check back often!

Click here to go to the list of Cooking classes | Click here to go to the list of Bardic classes | Click here to go to the list of Brewing classes


Confirmed Cooking Classes

1. "Period Gyngerbrede: A Survey" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Baroness Olivia d'Anjou
The purpose of this class is to look at the different types of period gingerbread. Gyngerbrede is more of a candy than gingerbread as we know it. We will make and mold one recipe of Gyngerbrede.
Maximum class size: 10. Class length: 2 hours. No cost to participants.

2. "Anglo-Saxon Foods (intermediate)" (Sunday, 9am-10am, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Baroness Aibhilin kennari fra Skye, OL
We will discuss what foods were available in period, how they could have been used based on the evidence. There are no extant recipes available so we will take what we know and come up with something to eat. People will be broken into small groups and given what they need to work with.
Maximum class size: 9-12. Class length: 2 hours. No cost to participants.

3. "Anglo-Saxon Foods (basic)" (Friday, 10pm, in the Harold room) (Sunday, 1pm-2pm, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Baroness Aibhilin kennari fra Skye, OL
An overview of what they had available, how we know this and where to find more information.
Maximum class size: no limit. Class length: 1 hour. No cost to participants.

4. "Celebration at the Serayi: 16th-C. Ottoman Cuisine" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Channon Mondoux aka Hauviette d'Anjou
Exerpts and research from my newly-released ebook based on the first known Turkish source recipes, as well as earlier sources and travelogues, dictionaries and artwork.
Class length: 1 hour.

5. "Vegetables of the Italian Renaissance" (Saturday, 1pm-2pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Mistress Helewyse de Birkestad
Join us as we investigate the scope of vegetable dishes cooked by Bartolomeo Scappi in 16th-Century Italy. We will cover the variety of vegetables cooked and the most common ways in which they were prepared for fast and feast days, as stand-alone dishes, and in pies.
Class length: 1 hour.

6. "Before Bechamel & Hollandaise: An Introduction to Medieval Sauces" (Sunday, 9am-10am, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Euriol of Lothian, OP
Not sure what to serve with that roasted meat? Come explore common sauces that are found in many of the medieval culinary texts. There will both be discussion, hand-on making of at least two sauces and sampling!
An electronic copy of the handout can be found at the following links: 1 2 3 4
Class length: 1 hour. Basic class. $2 fee for handout.

7. "Take a Quayle, and sle him: A Beginner's Guide to Redacting Medieval Recipes" (Saturday, 2pm-3pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Euriol of Lothian, OP
This class is a practical exercise in developing your own recipe based on extant recipes written down by the Master Cooks of the Middle Ages. You will learn how to interpret the ingredients and cooking processes from translations of extant manuscripts and create your own redaction (interpretation) of that recipe.
An electronic copy of the handout can be found at the following links: 1 2 3 4
Class length: 1 hour. Intermediate class.

8. "The Planning and Organizing of a Feast" (Sunday, 2pm-4pm, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Euriol of Lothian, OP
This class is a discussion of practical tips & tricks and lessons learned for planning and providing a feast for SCA events.
An electronic copy of the handout can be found at the following links: 1 2 3 4
Class length: 1 hour. Intermediate class.

9. "How I Did Coronation Feast for $200 Under Budget" (Sunday, 1pm-2pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Baroness Katja Davidova Orlova Khazarina, OP, OL
As a test case of the tips shared at several Frugal Feasts Roundtables in the past year, come learn and discuss what steps I took to save costs while planning a fancy, three-course, varied menu for a kingdom-level event feast. What worked? What didn't?
Class length: 1 hour.

10. "A Cure for What Ails You: A Humourous Feast" (Saturday, 2pm-4pm, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Victor of Shrewsbury and Elisabetta Tempesta
A description of a feast for which we served as head cooks which centered around the humoural nature of the dishes and includes a brief summary of the humoural theory. This is a lecture class but questions are always welcome.
Maximum class size: no limit. Class length: 1 hour.

11. "Chinese, Turkic and Middle Eastern Influences on Mongolian Court Cuisine of the 14th Century" (Saturday, 3pm-4pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Minowara Kiritsubo, OL, OP
We will investigate what comprised the native Mongolian cuisine; we will then discuss how those cultures with whom the Mongols had commerce influenced changes in what the Mongolian Court cuisine contained. We will include information from a number of period sources, including the Yin-shan Cheng-yao (Proper and Essential Things for the Emperor's Food and Drink), as contained in the book "Soup for the Qan, Yin-shan Cheng-yao" (Proper and Essential Things for the Emperor's Food and Drink), "Kitab al-Tibakha" (from Medieval Arab Cookery).
Class length: 1 hour. Cost to participants: $2 to cover handout.

12. "Scottish Food Stuffs and Kitchen Goods from 16th- & 17th-C. Records"
taught by Dame Margaret Macafee
This is an overview of the food stuffs listed in various compt, inventories, wills, import export lists, and other miscellaneous documents. "Kitchen goods" is a little more restricted, but I've located a couple of good will/inventory records that include kitchen items (one goes into such details as a skimmer, a brass and a stone mortar and pestle, a bread grater, and a pair of potclips).

13. "Samurai Chef - a Cooking Workshop" (Saturday, 10am-11am, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by THL Solveig Throndardottir
A hands-on introduction to the cuisine, etiquette, and food preparation techniques of ancient China and Japan. We will particularly focus on tugashi (Chinese sweets) associated with the tea ceremony, and sakana (snacks) associated with drinking parties.
Maximum class size: 12. Class length: 2 hours. Cost to participants: $1.00

14. "Celebration at the Serayi: 16th-C. Ottoman Cuisine - Part 2"
taught by Channon Mondoux, aka Hauviette d'Anjou
A hands-on class recreating an authentic 16th-century Ottoman recipe, never before translated into English. Redaction and creation of recipe from the first-known Turkish cookbook.
Class length: 1 hour.

15. "Restaurants and Catering in 13th-Century China - Sung Dynasty" (Sunday, 11am-12pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Mistress Gwyneth Banfhidhleir, OL
Learn about the early history of Chinese restaurants, takeout places, and banqueting facilities in Hangzhou, the capital of the Sung Dynasty.
Class length: 1 hour.

16. "Making Biscotti" (Sunday, 10:30am-12pm, in the Salamander kitchenette)
Biscotti are crunchy, oblong-shaped cookies that are enjoyed by dipping into your favorite beverage just before consuming, usually a sweet wine or coffee latte. The word "biscotti" in Italian is the plural form of "biscotto", which originates from the Medieval Latin word "biscoctus", meaning "twice-baked". These biscuits were baked twice in the oven so they could be stored for long periods of time, which was particulary useful during journeys and sialing voyages. Some people enjoy them with sweet wine for dessert; others have them with coffee for a quick but hearty breakfast.
This class will be a demonstration/workshop with limited class participation. Students will have the opportunity to feel the dough at various stages, to become familiar with the goal in terms of the proper feel of the dough and the finished product, and to try their hand at kneading, if they wish. Samples will be available for tasting, dunking, and enjoying.
The class will focus on the most traditional form of biscotti, made in the simplest, old-world method. The dough will be mixed by hand and kneaded on a "massa" board, then shaped into the form of a log and baked. A second baking removes most of the moisture from the cookie, leaving a robustly-flavored, long-lasting crunchy treat that has been the mainstay of many a traveler.
Class length: 1 hour. Cost to participants: $2.

17. "Fun with Gallo" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Salamander kitchenette)
taught by Mistress Eibhlin nic'Raghailligh
This class will redact and make 2 recipes found in the Gallo, Agostino Le Vinti giornate dell'agricoltvra et de'piaceri della villa manuscript "On the making of cheese" from 1585 AD, using the translation by Mistress Helewyse de Birkestad. We will make Honeyed Milk and Head of Milk. If time permits, the honeyed milk will be cooked into a tart.
Maximum class size: 12 attendees, but auditors are welcome. Class length: 1 hour. Cost to participants: $1 each to cover the cost of materials and handout.
NOTE: The students must supply their own equipment: a small bowl (enough to hold about 6 ounces of custard), a small plate, and a spoon.

18. "Translating Rumpolt-Ein New Kochbuch" (Saturday, 11am-12pm, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by Ranvaig the Weaver
A roundtable discussion on translation issues and German cooking after being foolish enough to translate a 400+ page, 16th-c. German cookbook using just rusty high school German.
Class length: 1 hour.

19. "Time to Make the Dough (Are You Nuts?)"
taught by Maestra Tomasia da Collivento
Hands-on theories and bread-making practices of the Middle Ages. Come and try the techniques of period bread making, and eat the fruits of your labors for dinner. This is to help finalize some theories and recipes before sitting down to make this class (hopefully) a compleat anachronist on the subject.

20. "Engaging New Cooks and Expanding the Dining Palate" (Sunday, 10am-11am, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by THL Dirk Edward of Frisia
Ever wonder how you can involve new cooks in the feast-making process and keep them coming back? Ever wonder how to present 2 very different meals at the same time? This class will give you a sample method to follow to do both of these-- at the same time, if you like-- and still retain your sanity. Handouts will be provided.
Maximum class size: 25 (possibly more, but handouts are limited). Class length: 1 hour.

21. "Portioning, Serving and Timing-- One Way to Get It Right" (Saturday, 10am-11am, in the Demeter classroom)
taught by THL Dirk Edward of Frisia
One of the most important skills in a kitchen is the computation of the size of servings of food being presented-- portioning. This is important bevause it saves time and cooking effort-- as well as money, if your calculation of the food required for a feast is done methodically in advance. In this class, we will discuss the tricky calculation of portioning, how to have money, presenting the dish, and making it look good, too. Handouts will be provided.
Maximum class size: 25 (possibly more, but handouts are limited). Class length: 1 hour.

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Confirmed Bardic Classes

1. ""The Angel of Death" Deconstructed" (Saturday, 1pm-3:30pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Fiana of Clare
Examines how good stories are put together by taking apart my story, "The Angel of Death." We will analyze it in terms of structure, imagery, medieval traditions, connection of details, and story-telling techniques.

2. "Old English Poetry" (Sunday, 11am-12pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Fiana of Clare
A quick-and-dirty introduction to the mechanics, techniques, and stylistic features of Old English poetry, for those who wish to compose in this form.

3. "Drottkveitt, Runhendt & Kennings: Adapting Old Norse Poetic Forms to SCA Uses" (Saturday, 4pm-6pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Fridrikr Tomasson av Knusslig Hamn
This class will discuss the drottkveitt and runhent as poetic (stanzaic) forms, along with some types of poetry that use the drottkveitt and runhent (lausavisur, flokkr, drapa, shield songs). We will discuss the difficulties of writing English poetry in Iceland stanza forms, using some of the teacher's poems as examples. The class will also discuss & practice the writing of kennings, the basic metaphorical building block of Old Norse & Anglo-Saxon poetry.

4. "Transcending Politics: the SCA Bard in the Social Crisis" (Sunday, 1pm-2:30pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Michael Alewright, with Morgana bro Morganwg and Ana de Guzman
Imagine this: The final round of Crown Tourney was... questionable. Cataclysmic mundane events have washed into the SCA experience. The King has used his position to turn a personal rivalry into a matter of state. The Royals are giving high-level awards to their own young children. A Laurel knowingly used her art to inflict harm upon another. A Peer posts a flame to the Kingdom's electronic distribution list. Someone well-known and respected by the populace has died. When and how does the bard speak? When is it better to stay silent, or to leave speech to others? How can one serve the needs of the populace while not making things worse? There is no easy or sure path, and here there surely be dragons.

5. "Basic Renaissance Poetry: More than Sonnets" (Sunday, 9am-10:30am, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Ana de Guzman
The sonnet is not the only form used by poets during the Renaissance. This is a beginners workshop for those who are not familiar with three forms of Renaissance poetry: (1) ottava rima, (2) rhyme royal (or Chaucerian stanza), and (3) terza rima. Structures, rhyme schemes, uses in period and from the SCA are all examined. The last 30-45 minutes will be devoted to having the class pick a form and collectively write a poem. With the permission of the students, the resulting poem will be submitted to the local Barony's or Kingdom's newsletter under the students' names.
Maximum class size: 20.

6. "Fairy Tale and Legend Workshop" (Saturday, 2:30pm-4pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Luceta di Cosimo
In this part-lecture, part-workshop class, we will go briefly over the history and definitions of fairy tales and legends, instances of fairy tales in period, how to look for period sources of both, and how to identify and use motifs to construct/reconstruct tales which could have been told/recorded in period. The participants in the workshop will construct a fairy tale and a legend.

7. "Basics of Vocal Production" (Saturday, 10am-11am, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Ursula the Widow
This class is intended for those who have never had a voice lesson. The fundamentals of breathing, support, projection and placement will be covered. These basics are of use to singers, heralds, and anyone who needs to project and be heard. The class is active and will involve standing and singing (or, if you are unable to stand, any upright posture will do).
The instructor first studied voice in the late 1970s, has performed in community theater and choruses since the age of eleven, has had various skilled teachers at Yale University, New York and London, and recently received the Midrealm's Order of the Willow for her singing, songwriting and teaching.
Maximum class size: 12. No spectators, please.

8. "Craft and the Bard: Which Way is Up?" (Sunday, 10:30am-12pm, in the Apollo classroom)
moderated by Zsof
This is a general roundtable discussion with and among Laurels in the Bardic Arts, exploring (among other things) the honing of one's craft, developing one's repertoire, courting the Muse, finding and making venues, "boosting" the various bardic arts, and serving the Society in which we perform. Bring your questions and experiences!

9. "Devices and Desires: Technical Aspects of the Love Poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym" (Sunday, 4:30pm-6pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Gwernin
A discussion of several of the technical devices used by this 14th-Century Welsh master, and their possible application in English.

10. "Roundtable: How to Make Period Pieces More Accessible to the Modern Bardic Circle" (Saturday, 4pm-6pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by AElfgyva
Many people have expressed interest in hearing and performing period poetry, songs and stories, and yet few pieces effectively make their way to the Bardic circle, where they often seem overpowered by popular "modern" folk tunes and SCAdian war songs. How do we show the Known World that period stuff is exciting and relevant, and that our ancestors were both talented and entertaining?
Questions include: "What choices need to be made when selecting and preparing a piece?" "How does one work within the dynamics of the circle?" "How can I engage the audience through my performance?" "What have we tried that seems to work?" If time allows, people can present their period pieces for feedback.

11. "I am a Man Upon the Land: an Ongoing Investigation Into the Origins and Distribution of the North Atlantic Seal Legends" (Sunday, 1pm-2:30pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Rowen Brithwallt
They are wound deeply through the folklore of the Northern Isles, from Orkney and Shetland, down the sweep of the Hebrides and the coasts of the Gael, as far-ranging as Ireland and Iceland and Greenland: the legends of the sluagh-ron, the seal people. Who and what were they thought to be? How old are the tales, and what are their sources? How does one track a legend, or determine the age of tales from an oral culture? We will discuss not only this particular set of legends, but of ways to extract the sources of tales when dealing with a largely oral culture.

12. "Anthropology of the SCA" (Saturday, 1oam-12pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Huginn

13. "Vocal Coaching Master Class" (Sunday, 1pm-2:30pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Giulietta da Venezia
Open critique of vocal production techniques and all aspects of vocal performance - an opportunity to receive personalized feedback and polishing, or just to learn from watching others perform and receiving feedback. Participants, please prepare a piece that you feel comfortable performing in front of others, by heart!
Maximum class size: 6 participants, but unlimited audience attendance is encouraged!

14. "Workshop: Translation as a Bardic Art" (Sunday, 2:30pm-4:30pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Eliane Halevy
Translating poetic texts is not only a period practice, it's fun! When you translate, what results is a new piece in its own right. This class will bring up some theoretical and practical aspects of translation, and then we'll translate a period poem together. A background in French will be helpful, but not necessary.

15. "Writing Humorous Songs" (Saturday, 3pm-4pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Cerian Cantwr
Discussion of different comedic elements and how they can be used in song.

16. "Frame That Tune: Setting Lyrics to Music" (Sunday, 4:30pm-6pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Garraed Galbraeth
How are lyrics set to music? This class will illustrate the process by crafting original tunes to lyrics offered to the instructors during the class period. If you have them, bring your own "problem" lyrics and tune snippets for discussion, if time permits.

17. "Poetry for Beginners" (Saturday, 1pm-2:30pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Clarice Roan Learn to write in rondelet and kyrielle styles. You will learn the basic structures and rhymes of one style and write in that form. We will end class with an informal bardic circle.
Maximum class size: 10 people. A class handout will be provided, but donations are appreciated.

18. "Introduction to Japanese Storytelling" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Solveig Throndardottir
An historical survey of Japanese pre-modern stories and literary forms. Includes an introduction to the storyteller' s art in pre-modern Japan and the social and cultural context for various story forms. Concludes with an introduction to distinctive Japanese literary styles and story telling techniques.
Maximum class size: 20 people.

19. "A Little about the Troubadours and Trouveres" (Sunday, 3:30pm-4:30pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Efenwealt Wystle
Secular music around the year 1200 and troubadour culture. Lecture and some performance.
Maximum class size: 6,812 people; unpledged souls preferred.

20. "Bardic Boot Camp" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Llywelyn Glyndwr
Soldiers go to boot camp to learn basic disciplines like marching and shooting straight, but too often Bards skip the step of knowing their essential tools. By contrasting passages from Old English and skaldic, Middle English and Renaissance poetry and song, we will explore some Bardic Basics-- the use of rhythm, sound patterns, and imagery-- and how they influence meaning. This session will be a lecture with some audience participation.

21. "Studio Introduction" (Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Mnemosyne studio)
taught by Gregory of Glencairn
This class is not mandatory for those who wish to use our Mnemosyne recording studio, but it is an excellent opportunity to meet the Engineer and begin to understand how the studio can work for you and how you can make the most of your time here. There will be opportunities both to book the studio for your own use during the weekend, and to join in open mic sessions. Bring your questions!

22. "Your First Album" (Sunday, 9am-10:30am, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Effenwealt Wystle and others
Too many artists get easily intimidated, and think you need $1,000s in equipment, a studio engineer, and a record label backing you. All you really need is time to tinker and a good ear. If you have recorded, bring your own experiences and perspectives. If you have not, bring your questions and concerns!

23. "Discussion: Running a Bardic Circle" (Saturday, 8pm-9pm, in the Apollo classroom)
taught by Brion Enkazi
Brion, your host for the bardic circle, will lead a discussion on thoughts, ideas and experiences of what works, what doesn't work, and what makes things "pop" at bardic circles. The class will specifically address the differences between large "mega-circles", and more intimate ones.

24. "Storytelling Master Class" (Sunday, 10:30am-12pm, in the Calliope classroom)
taught by Brion Enkazi
This class will combine coaching and discussion for storytellers (in either prose or verse), focusing on revising and perfecting an existing piece rather than on creating a new one. Mundane as well as SCA-compatible stories are welcome. Bring the non-musical piece you want to work on.
Maximum class size: six active tellers, but unlimited audience and assistants encouraged.

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Confirmed Brewing Classes

1. "Brew Like a Housewife" (Part one: Saturday, 9am-10am, in the Barm classroom; Part two: Saturday, 3pm-4pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by THLord Brandubh O'Donnghaile
A hands-on class in which we'll look at manor house records from 14th-century England, and make a reproduction of the ale discussed there.
Part one will cover the grain bill from the ratios up to starting the mash; part two will cover the multiple washes technique for ale of this period.

2. "Sekanjabins" (Sunday, 10am-11pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by Master Tofi Kerthjalfadsson
Sekanjabin is a type of syrup-based drink, based on vinegar, some sort of sugar, and often herbs and spices. We're going to make some, as well as discuss what can make a good sekanjabin.

3. "My Favorite Mead" (Sunday, 11am-12pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by THLord Brandubh O'Donnghaile
A hands-on class in which we'll look at manor house records from 14th-century England, and make a reproduction of the ale discussed there.
Part one of the class will cover the grain bill from the ratios up to starting the mash; part two will cover the multiple washes technique for ale of this period.

4. "Brewing Elizabethan Beer" (Sunday, 4pm-6pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by Master Gille MacDhnouill
We'll examine in detail a recipe for beer from Harrison's "Description of England in Shakespeare's Youth" (1575). Each step of the recipe will be translated to modern measurements, and the steps required to brew the beer on contemporary equipment will be described. I will discuss the two omissions from the recipe that make it difficult to re-create.
Samples will be provided to class participants who are over 21.

5. "Sticks and Stones" (Sunday, 1pm-2pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by Lord Magnus Jager
Experience and process in recreating a Stein beer without the benefit of modern tools. No thermometer, no burners, just wood, fire, rocks, and branches for straining the grain.

6. "Introduction to Cordials" (Sunday, 9am-10pm, in the Barm classroom)
taught by Baroness Clarice Roan of Delftwood
Making cordials is period and fun! I will show you my methods for making vodka-based cordials using fresh fruit, dried fruits, herbs, spices and extracts. This will be a basic level brewing class. Handouts will be provided, but donations are appreciated.

7. "Guitar-Free Single Malts" (Friday, 10pm, in the Harold room)
This is an open whisky tasting; the theme is for the Scottish variety of single-malt whiskies, however fine bourbons are welcome as well. Bring a bottle and a glass, and we'll raise a toast to Duke Sir Morguhn Sheridan.
Price of admission: 1 bottle

8. Pittsburgh Brewery Field Trip (Saturday, 10am-3pm)
organized by THLord Brandubh O'Donnghaile
This excursion to Pittsburgh will cover brewery tours of The Penn Brewery; a regionally-distributed German Lager Brewery; and the East End Brewery, a local distribution-only microbrewery, including meeting the brewers and Q&A sessions.
We will be eating lunch out, so bring money.
We will meet in the Barm Classroom at 10am and carpool/caravan to the breweries.

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